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Spring and Summer 2020 registration windows:
Tuesday, November 3 – Friday, November 13, 2020

It is strongly recommended that you meet with your advisor before course registration!

For information about placement testing, please visit our Placement Test FAQs.


S  C  H  E  D  U  L  E     O  F    C  L  A  S  S  E  S

 

Schedule of Classes, Spring 2021

Course No. Course Name Instructor Day Time Room Liberal Learning
⧫ CHINESE ⧫
CHI 152-01 First Year Intensive Chinese II Liu, Celia
Mi, Jia
M/Th
T/F
2:00 PM - 3:20 PM
2:00 PM - 3:20 PM
Remote
CHI 252-01 Second-Year Chinese II Mi, Jia-Yan M/Th 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
CHI 360-01 Chi. Philosophy & Calligraphy Liu, Celia M/Th 5:00 PM - 6:20 PM Remote WVWK/ Global
CHI 360-02 Chi. Philosophy & Calligraphy Liu, Celia M/Th 6:30 PM - 7:50 PM Remote WVWK/ Global
WLC 371-01 Kung Fu Cinema Mi, Jia-Yan T 5:30 PM - 8:20 PM Remote LVPA/Global/Race
⧫ FRENCH ⧫
FRE 101-01 French For Beginners I Bouachrine, Hind M/Th 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
FRE 102-01 French For Beginners II Tastenhoye, Paul M/Th 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM Bliss 234
FRE 102-02 French For Beginners II Tastenhoye, Paul M/Th 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Bliss 234
FRE 103-01 French For Beginners III Pfenninger, Ariane M/Th 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
FRE 103-02 French For Beginners III Pfenninger, Ariane M/Th 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM Remote
FRE 171-01 Contemporary France Bouachrine, Hind M/Th 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM Remote LVPA/Global
FRE 211-01 Intro to The French World Baker, Benjamin T/F 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
FRE 370-01 Topics in French Pfenninger, Ariane M/Th 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM Remote
⧫ GERMAN ⧫
GER 102-01 German For Beginners II Fenner, Karen T/F 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
GER 255-01 Business German Fenner, Karen T/F 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
⧫ ITALIAN ⧫
ITL 101-01 Italian For Beginners I Curcio, Timothy T/F 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
ITL 102-01 Italian For Beginners II De Santis, Silvio M/Th 8:00 AM - 9:20 AM Remote
ITL 102-02 Italian For Beginners II Bandurski, Karolina T/F 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote
ITL 103-01 Italian For Beginners III Wright, Simona M/Th 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
ITL 103-02 Italian For Beginners III Wright, Simona M/Th 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
ITL 171-01 Contemporary Italy De Santis, Silvio M/Th 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote LVPA/Global
ITL 211-01 Intermed. Comp. & Conv. Wright, Simona M/Th 8:00 AM - 9:20 AM Remote
ITL 351-01 Ital. Cinema from 1945 to Present Wright, Simona M 5:30 PM - 8:20 PM Remote LVPA
⧫ JAPANESE ⧫
JPN 152-01 Beginning Intensive Japanese II Kato, Makiko M/Th
W
2:00 PM - 3:20 PM
3:30 PM - 4:50 PM
Online, asynchronously
Remote
JPN 301-01 Advanced Japanese I Kato, Makiko M/Th 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM Remote
⧫LINGUISTICS⧫
LNG 201-01 Intro to English Language Steinberg, Diane Vanner M/Th 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM
LNG 202-01 Structure & History of English Steele, Felicia Jean T/F 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM SCHP
LNG 371-01
(HON 270)
World Englishes Steele, Felicia Jean M/Th 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM Global
SPA 215-01 Spanish Phonetics Morin, Regina T/F 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM Remote
SPA 350-01 Intro to Spanish Linguistics Morin, Regina T/F 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote
WLC 171-01 Introduction to the Languages Stillman, David M/Th 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote Global/LVPA
WLC 321-01 Intro to Historical Linguistics Stillman, David M/Th 3:30 PM - 5:20 PM Remote Global/SCHP
WLC 390-01 2nd Lang Acquisition Methods Goebel, Joseph W 5:30 PM - 8:20 PM Remote
⧫ SPANISH ⧫
SPA 101-01 Basic Spanish I Huguet, Marimar T/F 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 101-02 Basic Spanish I Huguet, Marimar T/F 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
SPA 102-01 Basic Spanish II Figueroa, Alvin M/Th 8:00 AM - 9:20 AM Remote
SPA 102-02 Basic Spanish II Figueroa, Alvin M/Th 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 102-03 Basic Spanish II Delbene, Roxana M/Th 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 102-04 Basic Spanish II Egas, Jenny M/Th 5:30 PM - 6:50 PM Remote
SPA 102-05 Basic Spanish II Maniaci, Jennifer M/Th 7:00 PM - 8:20 PM Remote
SPA 102-06 Basic Spanish II Foglietta, Luz T/F 8:00 AM - 9:20 AM Remote
SPA 102-07 Basic Spanish II Latorre, Sylvia T/F 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 103-01 Basic Spanish III Otero, Agustin M/Th 8:00 AM - 9:20 AM Remote
SPA 103-02 Basic Spanish III Otero, Agustin M/Th 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 103-03 Basic Spanish III Jimenez, Tulia M/Th 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote
SPA 103-04 Basic Spanish III Gabriel, Luis T/F 8:00 AM - 9:20 AM Remote
SPA 103-05 Basic Spanish III Warner Ault, Ann T/F 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 103-06 Basic Spanish III Gabriel, Luis T/F 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 103-07 Basic Spanish III Rosman, Adriana T/F 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
SPA 103-08 Basic Spanish III Morin, Regina T/F 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
SPA 103-09 Basic Spanish III Rosman, Adriana T/F 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote
SPA 103-10 Basic Spanish III Compte, Deborah T/F 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote
SPA 103-11 Basic Spanish III Warner Ault, Ann T/F 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM Remote
SPA 203-01 Intermediate Oral Proficiency Compte, Deborah T/F 9:30 AM - 10:50 AM Remote
SPA 203-02 Intermediate Oral Proficiency Compte, Deborah T/F 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
SPA 210-01 Spanish For Heritage Students Kentengian, Isabel M/Th 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM Remote
SPA 211-01 Intermediate Writing Proficiency Otero, Agustin M/Th 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM Remote
SPA 211-02 Intermediate Writing Proficiency Gabriel, Luis T/F 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote
SPA 215-01 Spanish Phonetics Morin, Regina T/F 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM Remote
SPA 219-01 Spanish For Medical Purposes Kentengian, Isabel M/Th 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM Remote
SPA 241-01 Intro to Lit In Spanish Huguet, Marimar T/F 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote LVPA/Global
SPA 270-01 Spanish American Cultures Figueroa, Alvin M/Th 12:30 PM - 1:50 PM Remote
SPA 270-02 Digital Culture in Spain & Lat. Amer. Warner Ault, Ann T/F 11:00 AM - 12:20 PM Remote
SPA 350-01 Intro to Spanish Linguistics Morin, Regina T/F 2:00 PM - 3:20 PM Remote
SPA 370-01 Topics in Spanish Rosman, Adriana T/F 3:30 PM - 4:50 PM Remote


C  O  U  R  S  E     D  E  S  C  R  I  P  T  I  O  N  S

 

Course Descriptions

CHI 152: First Year Intensive Chinese II

This is an intensive course which builds on the introduction to spoken and written Chinese from CHI 151, emphasizing aural comprehension and speaking, accompanied by practice in reading and writing.  Cultural audio-visual materials complement written course materials and emphasize the link between language and culture.  Conversation hour is required.  CHI 152 replace CHI 103 and 201, and covers the material from these two courses in a single semester.  Students enrolled in CHI 152 will earn 2 units (8 credits) for the course.

CHI 252: Second-Year Chinese II

This is an intensive second-year course in spoken and written contemporary standard Chinese, emphasizing communicative practice in authentic cultural contexts.  Cultural and audio-visual materials complement written course materials and emphasize the link between language and culture.  Conversation hour is required.  Cultural audio-visual materials and use of Chinese websites help to reinforce the link between language and culture.  This class meets Mondays, Tuesdays, Thursdays, and Fridays.  All students are required to participate in a conversation hour.

CHI 360: Chinese Philosophy & Calligraphy

This course focuses on the development of Chinese philosophy and its modern applications, combined with learning the Chinese calligraphy technique. The dual emphasis on philosophy and the aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy will provide students with a more comprehensive understanding of the background and the practice of Chinese philosophy. A comparative approach to those materials will present students with ¿divergent points of view in the global community and require that they learn to recognize and respect a culture or society that is different from their own and comprehend some of its connections with other parts of the world. This course will be conducted in English.

FRE 101: French For Beginners I

FRE 102: French For Beginners II

FRE 103: French For Beginners III

An introduction to spoken and written French, emphasizing the skills of comprehension and speaking, complemented by practice in reading and writing. Language laboratory required for FRE 103. Oral Proficiency Class is required for FRE 103. Students are urged to complete FRE 101, 102, and 103 in consecutive semesters.

FRE 171: Contemporary France

This course is an interdisciplinary survey course that does not require any knowledge of French. Students will learn about French culture, make comparisons between this culture and their own, and establish connections with other disciplines such as history, sociology, film studies, and literature. We will study both products and practices of French culture, participating in group-activities to analyze a broad range of texts including those representative of high culture (e.g., literature and film) and low culture (e.g., television commercials or expectations of riding in the subway in Paris). Ultimately, students will gain a nuanced understanding of the social practices and expectations of French in their own native speech community and will develop and practice critical thinking skills in analyzing stereotypical ideas of France, French, and French culture. Students will demonstrate a sophisticated understanding of France as a complex society with a turbulent history and a future fraught with both potential and challenge. Students with French-language expertise may opt to take the course for LAC credit with readings and papers in French.

FRE 211: Intro to The French and Francophone World

This course is designed to provide intensive oral and written practice in French at the Intermediate level with emphasis on vocabulary building, increased aural comprehension, and development of oral and written expression.  Through selected readings, movies, and discussions, students will gain insight on cultural, sociopolitical, and economic issues of the contemporary French and Francophone world.  Oral Proficiency Class is required.

FRE 370: Topics in French

French Cinema

GER 102: German For Beginners II

An introduction to spoken and written German, emphasizing the four skills of comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing. Prepares student for situations which may be encountered in German-speaking countries. Audio-visual aids and videotapes are used regularly. Completion of listening exercises and recitation/conversation hours to improve comprehension and oral proficiency are required.

GER 255: Business German

This course is designed for advanced students interested in becoming acquainted with the more specific language of German business and at the same time improving the communication skills acquired in previous German courses. The focus will be on the terminology of German business as well as practices and cultural customs of the German-speaking business world. This course is open to students interested in economic issues, whether or not they have prior knowledge in this field.

ITL 101: Italian For Beginners I

An introduction to spoken and written Italian, emphasizing aural comprehension and speaking, accompanied by practice in reading and writing.  The textbook, to be used over three semesters, will be complemented by the video programs in Italiano and Attualitë. (Language laboratory and recitation/conversation hour required.) Students with more than three years of high school study in Italian will not receive credit for 101.

ITL 102: Italian For Beginners II

ITL 103: Italian For Beginners III

This sequence is founded on the five C’s of the National Foreign Language Standards. Students will have the opportunity to practice the three modes of Communication to learn about Italian Culture and to make Comparisons between their first language and culture and the Italian language and culture. In addition, students make Connections to other fields of study unavailable to them through their native language. Finally, students have the opportunity to engage with the Italian Community outside of the classroom. The goal of the basic Italian sequence therefore is to produce students with an observable and definable degree of language proficiency. Proficiency is measured by the achievement of particular benchmarks as defined by ACTFL in the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and supported by the five C¿s cited above.  Conversation hour is required in ITL 101, 102, and 103.

ITL 171: Contemporary Italy

This course surveys the history, culture, and society of Modern Italy from 1861 to the present. Using historical documents, literature, the arts, and films, the course seeks to provide understanding of modern Italy and its current issues. We will cover many aspects of modern Italian society and explore how Italian artistic products engage with key questions and issues such as language, immigration, emigration, family, gender roles, the North-South divide, and the rise of new social and cultural paradigms. In addition, we will draw comparisons between the society in the United States and that of contemporary Italy.

ITL 211: Intermediate Composition & Conversation

This course is designed to provide intensive oral and written practice in Italian at the intermediate level through the study of contemporary Italian culture and discussion of related issues, with emphasis on vocabulary building, increased aural comprehension, and development of oral and written expression. Oral Proficiency Class required.

ITL 351: Italian Cinema from 1945 to Present

This course (in English) will concentrate on the history of contemporary Italian cinema from Neorealism to the present.  Students will view and analyze the most influential films and auteurs of various periods of recent Italian history.  This course will present an in depth overview of the development of social, political and cultural aspects of Italian society through the post-World War II era; the economic boom of the sixties and seventies; the building of a neo capitalist society in the eighties; and the issue of migration into Italy from Africa and Eastern Europe in the nineties.  Readings will incorporate scholarly articles on the films and directors studied.

JPN 152: Beginning Intensive Japanese II

JPN 152 is an intensive course which builds on the introduction to spoken and written Japanese from JPN151, emphasizing aural comprehension and speaking, accompanied by practice in reading and writing. Cultural audio-visual materials complement written course materials and emphasize the link between language and culture. Conversation hour is required. JPN 152 replaces JPN 103 and 201, and covers the material from these two courses in a single semester. Students enrolled in JPN 152 will earn two course units for the course.

JPN 301: Advanced Japanese I

This class is designed for students who have already taken JPN 151/152/251 or 202 or have equivalent knowledge and skills of that level. This course focuses on reading and writing skills. The objectives of this course are to: understand everyday conversations, acquire more advanced effective communication skills, using appropriate sentences and vocabulary, improve reading skills, including skimming, scanning, and intensive reading, improve writing skills, including descriptions and some functional writing tasks, such as letter writing, and to acquire socio-cultural information on the Japanese language and people.

SPA 101: Basic Spanish  I

SPA 102: Basic Spanish  II

SPA 103: Basic Spanish  III

This sequence is founded on the five C’s of the National Foreign Language Standards.  Students will have the opportunity to practice the three modes of Communication to learn about Hispanic Culture and to make Comparisons between their first language and culture and the Spanish language and culture.  In addition, students make Connections to other fields of study unavailable to them through their native language.  Finally, students have the opportunity to engage with the Hispanic Community outside of the classroom.  The goal of the basic Spanish sequence therefore is to produce students with an observable and definable degree of language proficiency.  Proficiency is measured by the achievement of particular benchmarks as defined by ACTFL in the four skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and supported by the five C’s cited above.  Conversation hour is required in SPA 101, 102, and 103. Students with four or more years of high school Spanish will not receive credit for 101. Heritage speakers will NOT receive credit for 101, 102 or 103.

SPA 203: Intermediate Oral Proficiency

This course focuses on the development of students’ Spanish oral proficiency at the ACTFL intermediate level.  Oral proficiency will be continually stressed through interviews, storytelling, debates, role-playing and oral presentations on cultural products, practices and perspectives.  Oral proficiency development will be supported with written journals and readings. Appropriate grammar points will be illustrated in order to support growth in intermediate oral proficiency.

SPA 210: Spanish For Heritage Students

Introduction to the study of the Spanish language structures through grammar and basic linguistics.  This course is intended for heritage or bilingual students whose primary knowledge of the language comes from home or another out-of-class setting, but who have not studied the language in a formal way. Emphasis will be placed on the study of the diversity of the Spanish-speaking world.

SPA 211: Intermediate Writing Proficiency

This course focuses on the development of students’ written skills in Spanish. Grammar will be reviewed in order to provide the tools for more sophisticated written expression.  Assignments will include journals, essays, autobiographical papers, and creative pieces.  Students will also utilize the World Wide Web to correspond in written Spanish and to summarize and analyze current events news found at numerous sites.

SPA 215: Spanish Phonetics

The objectives of this course are to develop a solid understanding of Spanish spelling, stress patterns and pronunciation, and the relationship between these three aspects of the Spanish sound system.  Students will improve their spelling, pronunciation and listening skills by applying knowledge gained from written texts and by doing practical listening and pronunciation exercises.

SPA 219: Spanish For Medical Purposes

An honest self-assessment of Spanish language skills is the best prerequisite for this course. Students will be required to read and report on (orally and in writing) materials ranging from newspaper articles to publications in professional journals in Spanish, to interview native Spanish speakers and to transcribe these interviews, and to write a final paper in Spanish. Students will acquire the necessary medical vocabulary to successfully read and understand Spanish-language texts related to health and medicine, understand the cultural and linguistic aspects of treating a non-English-speaking Hispanic population, and learn to define common medical problems and discuss their causes, risk factors, symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention in Spanish. SPA 103 is the prerequisite, but SPA 203 is strongly suggested.

SPA 241: Intro to Lit In Spanish

Selected readings from the literary traditions of Spain and Latin America. Progressive development of reading and literary skills in Spanish.  Seminar format emphasizes oral and written expression.  Fundamental approaches to literary interpretation will be introduced.

SPA 270-01: Spanish American Cultures

SPA 270-02: Digital Culture in Spain & Latin America

SPA 350: Intro to Spanish Linguistics

The objectives of this course are to use readings and practical exercises to develop a solid understanding of language in general, and of the Spanish language in particular.  This includes an understanding of the various systems that make up the Spanish language: its sounds, its word formation component, its grammar and its word meanings.  This course aims to develop the students’ ability to analyze data to form hypotheses, and to prove and disprove these hypotheses through argumentation and the use of empirical research.  This course aims to develop linguistic and analytical skills.

SPA 370: Literature and Revolution in Latin America

LITERATURA Y REVOLUCIÓN  EN LATINOAMÉRICA

WLC 171: Introduction to the Languages

This course will survey the major language families of the world and examine the relationships among them. We will study their geographic location past and present, migration patterns of their speakers, typological differences among languages, the relationship between language and culture, and the origins of the world’s written scripts. The course will examine the relationship between language and dialect, the reasons why languages change, how languages influence each other, how new languages are formed, and how languages decline and die. We will look at the components of language such as the sound system, the grammatical apparatus, vocabulary and examine how these components can change over time.

WLC 321: Intro to Historical Linguistics

This course will introduce basic concepts of historical linguistics with a focus on the development of the Indo-European language family. Students will study examples of phonetic and phonological change, morphological change, syntactical change, lexical development, and the competition of centrifugal and centripetal forces in language communities. Students will study linguistic geography, the relationship of language and culture, the role of dialects, and linguistic register as factors in language change. Students will become familiar with the major language families of the world as they work on problems in historical linguistics and see the role of archaeology and history in historical linguistics. This course will contain a Languages across the Curriculum (LAC) component.

WLC 371: Kung Fu Cinema

WLC 390: Second Lang Acquisition Methods

This course explores how the human brain acquires languages. It prepares pre- and in-service teachers by providing them with the in-depth theoretical and practical knowledge necessary to  teach a foreign language. In keeping with the NCATE Foreign Language Teacher Standards and the New Jersey State Standards, this course explores:  a) second language acquisition theories and applications; b) the teaching of the five Cs of the National Standards; and c) the use of technology-enhanced instruction. This course is usually taken during the junior year; it must be taken before student teaching. The course is taught in English.


 

M  A  J  O  R     R  E  Q  U  I  R  E  M  E  N  T  S

Spanish Major

  • Graduation requires a GPA of 2.0 in courses for the program and a minimum grade of C- in all Spanish courses.
  • 12 courses required; students placing out of 203/210 and/or 211 must still take 12 courses.

(Fulfills Liberal Learning requirements)

Required 200-level courses: (4 courses)

Prerequisites

Retention

SPA 203 Intermediate Oral Proficiency

-or- SPA 210 Spanish for Heritage Speakers

103 & oral proficiency test

Heritage speakers only

SPA 211 Intermediate Writing Proficiency 103/placement test B- to transfer in/retention
SPA 215 Spanish Phonetics 203/210 and 211 B- to transfer in/retention
SPA 241 Introduction to Literature in Spanish (LVPA/Global, Writing) 203/210 and 211 B- for retention

Elective 200-level course: (Choose 1 course)

SPA 216 Current Events 203/210 and 211
SPA 217 Intro to Hispanic Culture 203/210 and 211
SPA 218 Business Spanish 203/210 and 211
SPA 219 Spanish for Medical Purposes 103 (203 is strongly recommended)
SPA 270 Topics 203/210 and 211 (and 215 for Linguistics topics courses)

Optional 200-level courses

SPA 223 Experiential Learning     (.5 units) One 200-level course

300-level courses: (6 courses)

Choose at least ONE course from each category: Linguistics, Culture/Civilization, Literature. A minimum grade of C- is required.
LINGUISTICS:  
SPA 301 Advanced Spanish Grammar Four courses at 200 level
SPA 350 Intro Spanish Linguistics 203/210, 211, 215
SPA 351 Spanish/English Translation I 301 or 350 or three 300-level courses
SPA 370 Topics in Spanish (Linguistics) One 200-level SPA course in linguistics
SPA 372 History of the Spanish Language (SCHP) SPA 215 and SPA 350 OR WLC 251
SPA 373 Intro Spanish Bilingualism in US Four courses at 200 level
SPA 391 Independent Study in Spanish (depends on topic) Four courses at 200 level & permission of instructor
CULTURE/CIVILIZATION:  
SPA 303 Culture/Society of Spain 3 courses at the 200 level
SPA 304 Civilization of Spanish America 3 courses at the 200 level
SPA 370 Topics in Spanish (Culture) 3 courses at the 200 level
SPA 391 Independent Study in Spanish (depends on topic) Four courses at 200 level & permission of instructor
LITERATURE:  
SPA 311 Survey of Spanish Peninsular Literature (LVPA/Global) SPA 241
SPA 312 Survey of Spanish-American Literature (LVPA/Global) SPA 241
SPA 323 20th– Century Hispanic Theater (LVPA/Global) SPA 241
SPA 327 Hispanic Short Story (LVPA/Global) SPA 241
SPA 331 Spanish – American Novel (LVPA/Global) SPA 241
SPA 348 Seminar in Hispanic Film (LVPA/Global) SPA 241
SPA 353 Contemporary Literature of Spain SPA 241
SPA 370 Topics in Spanish (Literature) SPA 241
SPA 391 Independent Study in Spanish (depending on topic) Four courses at 200 level & permission of instructor

OPTIONAL 300 level courses separate from the three categories above

SPA 302 Advanced Spanish Oral Proficiency Two courses above the 203/210 level
AND placement test Intermediate-Mid or higher
SPA 370 Topics courses taken abroad The same pre-requisites as a regular SPA 370 class (in each respective category) PLUS Advisor´s and Chair’s approval
SPA 391 Overseas Cultural Studies (Weekly Diaries)
(ONLY Pass/Fail; may NOT count as one of the six required 300 level courses)
Advisor’s approval
SPA 497 Spanish Senior Seminar (1 course) Four 300-level courses and Senior status at the beginning of this class

Spanish/Education Major

In order to receive a teaching license, the state of NJ requires

  • Spanish major (or at least 30 credits in Spanish with a variety of levels and topics.)
  • Completion of the Spanish Language Praxis II (#5195) with a minimum score of 168
  • A state-approved course in second language acquisition for ANY CERTIFICATION to teach Spanish (Pre-K, Elementary, Middle or Secondary.) At TCNJ, that course is WLC 390, taught each Spring, Weds 5:30 p.m. (In order to enroll in WLC 390, students must have successfully completed ONE course above SPA 210 and earned a minimum rating of Intermediate Mid on the ACTFL Oral Proficiency Exam.)
  • A minimum OPI rating of ACTFL Advanced Low

World Languages and Linguistics Major

  • A total of 12 course units is the minimum requirement for the World Languages and Linguistics major: Liberal Arts.
  • At least 5 courses must be taken at the 300 level.

Linguistics Requirements

Linguistic Theory Core Course (choose at least one)

ANT 213 Language and Culture: An Introduction to Linguistic Anthropology
LNG 201 Introduction to the English Language
WLC 215 Introduction to Linguistics

Linguistic History Core Course (choose at least one)

LNG 202 Structure and History of the English Language (SCHP)
WLC 220 Introduction to Romance Linguistics (SCHP/Global)
WLC 321 Introduction to Historical Linguistics

Linguistics Options (at least one must be at the 300 level or above; any core course not listed here can be chosen as an option)

ANT 390 Research Course in Anthropology (when the topic is related to discourse analysis)
JPN 370 Topics in Japanese (when the title is Introduction to Japanese Linguistics)
LNG 311 Contemporary English Grammar
LNG 371 World Englishes
LNG 372 American English Dialects
LNG 391 or SPA 391, or other appropriate Independent Study
PHL 421 Philosophy of Language
SPA 215 Spanish Phonetics
SPA 301 Advanced Spanish Grammar
SPA 350 Introduction to Spanish Linguistics
SPA 351 Spanish/English Translation I
SPA 372 History of the Spanish Language
SPA 373 Introduction to Hispanic Bilingualism in the United States
WLC271 / WGS271 / ANT270 Gender and Language
WLC 371 Topics in Linguistics in English

All students must take:

WLC 390 Second Language Acquisition and Related Methodologies
WLC 493 Research Seminar Capstone

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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